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Erbology
How to make milk thistle tea

How to make milk thistle tea

  • 1

    Serving

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 3'

  • Total Time

    Total Time 6′

  • Easy

    Easy

  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

  • 1

    Serving

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 3'

    PT3M
  • Total Time

    Total Time 6'

    PT6M
  • Easy

    Easy

  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

Vegan

Comforting and cleansing, our milk thistle tea recipe is a delicious and simple way to enjoy the benefits of this impressive plant. Drink up to help support the health of your liver and cleanse your body.

Mystical milk thistle

Native to the Mediterranean region, milk thistle (Silybum marianum) is a robust and striking plant that grows on rocky slopes and outcrops. It has spiky purple flowers that draw the eye, surrounded by sharp, shiny green leaves lined with pale white veins. According to legend, these white streaks appeared when a drop of the Virgin Mary’s milk fell on the plant’s leaves. This is why people also refer to the milk thistle by holy-sounding nicknames such as blessed milkthistle and Mary’s thistle. Despite its spiny appearance, it’s actually from the same family as the daisy and the sunflower. In addition to it featuring in religious folklore, people have been using milk thistle as a traditional remedy for generations. It’s believed that the Greek physician and botanist Dioscorides (40–90 AD) was the first person to mention the plant’s healing properties.(1) Since then, numerous herbalists across the ages have written about its medicinal benefits. Meanwhile, modern scientific studies are finding convincing evidence to back up the veracity of these claims. There are lots of different ways in which you can take milk thistle. The leaves, stem and seeds are all edible, and you can steep them in hot water to make a basic milk thistle organic tea. Another option is to use the seeds to brew an alternative to coffee. With Erbology, you can get cold-pressed milk thistle oil and milk thistle powder – like the one we use in this recipe. You can then add these to soups, stews and smoothies to make your life easier!

The milk thistle tea recipe: soothing for body and mind

While it’s possible to cook and eat milk thistle leaves, stalks and flowers in salads and other dishes, nowadays it’s quite tricky to find fresh plants to work with. That’s another reason why choosing to use milk thistle powder or oil is more convenient. You’re able to include these in all sorts of recipes – including milk thistle tea. Technically, you can make milk thistle tea by just stirring milk thistle powder into hot water. However, with the addition of just a few simple ingredients, you can create a truly delicious and soul-warming drink in under 10 minutes. In our opinion, the extra effort is more than worth it! The base of this recipe is unsweetened oat milk, which gives the tea a rich and creamy texture. Feel free to substitute this for any other type of plant-based milk, such as almond or coconut, if you prefer. However, remember that if you use a sweetened variety, you might like to alter the amount of honey or agave nectar you add. This will help to balance out the flavour of the drink. Speaking of sweeteners, you’ll notice that in the recipe, we’ve given you some leeway in terms of how much you want to use. This enables you to adjust the taste to suit your palate or the time of day you’re enjoying your milk thistle tea. Incidentally, if you don’t have honey or agave nectar on hand, maple syrup can be a great alternative for adding sweetness. Whichever you choose, it will be a perfect counterpart for the slight bitterness of the milk thistle powder.

Cardamom power

Milk thistle powder brings a nutty flavour to the tea, which we complement with the addition of crushed cardamom pods. This spice comes from various plants in the ginger family, and is a common ingredient in Indian, Middle Eastern and Swedish cuisine. The taste is piney yet subtly sweet, suiting beverages, desserts, and savoury dishes. It’s a fantastic way to bring extra warmth, aroma and vibrancy to milk thistle tea. This is especially true when you pair it with a sprinkle of cinnamon at the end. There are two main types of cardamom – green and black – which each have a unique flavour. Use green cardamom for a hint of lemon and mint, or black cardamom if you want more of a smoky note to your milk thistle tea. You might also come across white cardamom, which is similar to green cardamom, but with a less intense taste. Cardamom has plenty of health benefits of its own. These include helping to lower blood pressure and protect the liver, making it an ideal addition to liver health-supporting milk thistle tea.(2)(3) It can even improve oral health and tackle bad breath by fighting the common mouth bacteria that cause gum disease and cavities.(4) Therefore, you can feel confident enjoying a cup before heading out!

Silymarin: the source of milk thistle tea benefits

While cardamom offers a range of health-boosting properties, the real st