Header
  • 5

    Serving

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 15'

  • Total Time

    Total Time 35'

  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

  • No refined sugar

    No refined sugar

  • Vegan

    Vegan

Raw vegan chocolate bar recipe

  • 5

    Serving

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 15'

    PT15M
  • Total Time

    Total Time 35'

    PT35M
  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

  • No refined sugar

    No refined sugar

  • Vegan

    Vegan

Vegan

Pure and simple: dark chocolate is irresistible. The rich cacao combined with the silkiness of cacao butter is to die for – although we’d much prefer to live for it!

Chocolate is even better when it is not a guilty pleasure. In this recipe, the granola provides a good strong dose of high quality fibre and is packed with nutrition including magnesium, B vitamins and iron, while the pumpkin seeds serve up a protein-packed punch. Our bar is just as good for your digestive system as it is for your taste buds.

 

organic gluten-free granola

Coco loco

Be sure to search out unsweetened coconut flakes. Interesting observation, yet to be interpreted definitively by food scientists: in the South Pacific, where various forms of coconut can make up more than half of the calories taken in daily, the rates of heart disease are significantly lower than in the United States and Europe. 100 grams of unsweetened dried coconut supplies 88% of the recommended daily intake of copper, and it is also a source of manganese, phosphorus, selenium, and zinc, among other minerals.(1)

We rarely need an excuse to eat chocolate, but if you are not familiar with how beneficial raw dark chocolate can be, you’re in for a surprise. It also makes you think about how much we have been conditioned to see the heavily processed, sugar-filled milk chocolate that we are marketed as what chocolate is supposed to be.

Did you know that raw dark chocolate is more effective against free radicals than any other fruit tested for ORAC, or oxygen radical absorbance capacity? Although ORAC is measured in a test tube and may differ than how food actually acts within the human body, the results are still intriguing. Cacao is more powerful in this way than açai, blueberries, or other fruits marketed as superfoods. It also contains far more polyphenols; the polyphenols found in cacao are highly protective of cardiovascular activity.(2)(3)

Skin and mind

Another intriguing benefit of dark chocolate is its apparent ability to make the skin more tolerant of the harmful effects of the sun. A study showed that the minimum amount of UVB rays that caused sunburn in subjects doubled after eating dark chocolate for three months!(4)

However, our favourite possible health benefit of dark chocolate? A study showed that it may help blood flow to the brain.(5) The next time we turn to a few intense squares of dark chocolate after a hard day, that one is the justification we’ll turn to….

Most importantly – chocolate is heaven, and most of us on Earth can use the occasional bite of heaven, especially when it’s all starred up with sea buckthorn, aronia berries, pumpkin seeds, and coconut flakes. That’s why the ingredients for this raw chocolate bar head our shopping list, and will stay right up there for a good long while. Live for chocolate, rather than die for chocolate, indeed…

References

(1) My Food Data

(2) Aprotososoaie et al, “The Cardiovascular Effects of Cocoa Polyphenols—An Overview”, Diseases, 2016, https://bit.ly/2GN2izL.

(3) Crozier at al, “Cacao seeds are a “Super Fruit”: A comparative analysis of various fruit powders and products” Chemistry Central Journal, 2011, https://bit.ly/2VZPKK4.

(4) Williams et al, “Eating chocolate can significantly protect the skin from UV light.” Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology, 2009, https://bit.ly/2p83xkT.

(5) Francis et al, “The effect of flavanol-rich cocoa on the fMRI response to a cognitive task in healthy young people.” Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 2006, https://bit.ly/2jOZaqh.

Snacks

Ingredients
Print

  • 2 cups raw cacao butter
  • 2 tbsp honey or maple syrup
  • 4-5 tbsp cacao powder
 
Toppings
   

Typical nutrition / serving

  • Energy (calories) 158 kcal
  • Protein: 3.4g
  • Fat: 15.2g
  • Carbohydrate: 53.68g

Here's how you make it

  • In a medium bowl, melt the cacao butter over a bowl with boiling water.
  • Once melted, whisk in the cacao powder and honey or maple syrup until smooth.
  • With a spatula, spoon the chocolate mixture onto the prepared parchment-lined pan or sheet and spread evenly.
  • Sprinkle the toppings: tigernut granola, coconut flakes and pumpkin seeds.
  • Place into refrigerator on a flat surface for about 15 minutes, until it’s solid.
  • When ready, break apart into bark and store in the refrigerator until the chocolate is hard. Enjoy! (Note: we don't recommend keeping it out on the counter long because it can melt fast.)
 

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