• 4

    Servings

  • Gluten-free

  • Nut-free

  • Prep Time 25'

  • Total Time 30'

Roasted cauliflower milk thistle salad recipe

  • 4

    Servings

  • Gluten-free

  • Nut-free

  • Prep Time 25'

  • Total Time 30'

The name says it all, this is some delectable cauliflower! I am a huge fan of cauliflower, it is so versatile and can be used to mimic a lot of traditional, non-plant-based dishes. Try substituting cauliflower instead of starchy foods, such as potatoes or rice. Cauliflower is low in fat and cholesterol and makes for a great, low-calorie option for a lot of our favourite dishes (1). I recently tried buffalo cauliflower wings, I don’t think I have had real buffalo wings but they can’t possibly be any tastier than the cauliflower version.!

Cauliflower was one of those vegetables that I would never eat as a kid. No matter how my mum tried to disguise it or dress it up, there was no fooling me. It is funny that now I am looking for ways to eat more of it, I guess our flavour palettes really do evolve. Quick tip for all of you out there that are new to cauliflower, you want to choose cauliflower with solid, white heads. If you see the brown speckles, it may be that the cauliflower is oxidizing and about to go bad.

This recipe is so simple and the cauliflower “steak” makes great leftovers for a sandwich or salad the next day. The cooking process goes more smoothly if you can manage to slice your steaks into even pieces that all take the same time to cook. From my personal experience, the cauliflower doesn’t always cooperate. If you end up with smaller florets, do not worry! Throw it all on the pan and just watch the smaller pieces as they will need to come out first.

I was trying to think of a flavour that would enhance the taste of the cauliflower but not be overpowering. I found that Erbology Organic Milk Thistle Oil is nutty and light in flavour and is a great compliment to any vegetable.

My goal is always to create balanced meals, they must have protein, fibre, fats, and greens. With this in mind, I came up with a yummy base for my cauliflower. While my cauliflower was baking, I had plenty of time to arrange a bed of arugula and boil a few green peas. You can use different greens if you would like, but make sure that if you substitute out the peas, you are adding another source of protein such as lentils or quinoa (2).

Trust me, if you like cauliflower and balsamic, you can not go wrong here. You will love this combination and it is the perfect dish to bring over for a dinner or cocktail. I don’t think you will have anyone believing they are actually eating steak, but you will have a pretty dish and a great conversation starter.

Cauliflower is insanely rich in vitamin C.

Cauliflower is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin B-6 (1). A cup of cooked cauliflower contains 55 mg of vitamin C, that is nearly our entire daily recommended value (1). Vitamin C boasts an impressive list of health benefits. Of these, we have already discussed its contributions to our immune systems as well as collagen formation. There are also studies that show vitamin C to aid in the tissue healing and regeneration process of injuries (3).

The same cup fulfils 8% of our daily recommended intake of vitamin B-6. Also known as the anti-anxiety vitamin, B-6 influences serotonin levels and subsequently our overall state of being (4).

Written By: Danielle Bear

 

(1) “Cauliflower, Raw Nutrition Facts & Calories.” Nutrition Data Know What You Eat., nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2390/2.

(2) “All about the Protein Foods Group.” Choose MyPlate, 3 Nov. 2017, www.choosemyplate.gov/protein-foods#.

(3) Chambial, Shailja, et al. “Vitamin C in Disease Prevention and Cure: An Overview.” Indian Journal of Clinical Biochemistry, Springer India, Oct. 2013, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3783921/.

(4) McCarty, M F. “High-Dose Pyridoxine as an ‘Anti-Stress’ Strategy.” Medical Hypotheses., U.S. National Library of Medicine, May 2000, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10859691.

Ingredients

  • ½  small cauliflower
  • 2 cups green peas
  • 4 generous handfuls of fresh arugula (fresh baby spinach works well too!)
  • 1 tsp curry  
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • Black sesame seeds to sprinkle on top
  • ¼ cup Erbology Organic Milk Thistle Oil
 

Here's how you do it

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF.
  2. Wash the cauliflower and then chop in half. Slice one half into “steaks” and combine in a bowl with a drizzle of olive oil, salt, and curry powder.
  3. Place the cauliflower on parchment paper or directly on a lightly-oiled baking sheet and bake for 15-20 minutes, or until soft.
  4. While your cauliflower is baking, bring a pot of water and salt to a boil. Once boiling, add the green peas and allow them to boil for 3-5 minutes, depending on their size. You do not want to over-boil. So, once you drain them, cover in cold water to stop the cooking process.
  5. Remove the cauliflower from the oven and let cool for a few minutes.
  6. Arrange a bed of fresh arugula on a platter, add the cauliflower on top with the green peas.
  7. Decorate with black sesame seeds, add a drizzle of balsamic vinegar (1-2 tbsp) and top with Erbology Organic Milk Thistle Oil.
 

Tags

  • Cauliflower
  • Gluten-free
  • Milk thistle
  • Salad
  • Skin food
  • Spring recipes
  • Vitamin C

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