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  • 4

    Servings

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 30'

  • Total Time

    Total Time 35'

  • Nut-free

    Nut-free

  • Vegan

    Vegan

Baba ganoush with milk thistle oil recipe

  • 4

    Servings

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 30'

    PT30M
  • Total Time

    Total Time 35'

    PT35M
  • Nut-free

    Nut-free

  • Vegan

    Vegan

Vegan

Baba ganoush is a simple dish that inspires great passion. There are as many ways to make it as there are chefs, and each way comes with its dilemmas. First up would be – should you grill the aubergine or char over a gas flame? Next up – probably the decision of whether mashing the aubergine or cutting it into thin strips would be tastier. Still going? You should think about if garlicking up or garlicking down is your way. How about which herbs you are going to use? But, most importantly – should you use tahini in the recipe?

organic gluten-free crackers

 

After all that, we dare to offer this recipe for your kind consideration. Note that the characterizing combination of smoky aubergine and garlic is unchanged. However, we’ve taken the liberty of slipping in some non-traditional elements. Certainly they will go a long way towards supporting your poor body. After all, you probably bombard it daily with toxins and stresses.

An apple cider vinegar a day keeps the doctor away.

Apple cider vinegar is an ancient folk remedy and its benefits are currently being backed up with scientific research. For instance, studies have supported its ability to lower blood sugar and help with weight control.(1)(2)

The holy thistle

Milk thistle oil is rich in omega-6 fatty acids, vitamin E and other valuable phytonutrients. As a result, milk thistle oil can gently cleanse your body, boost your heart activity and renew your skin. The lightly earthy flavor complements the mildness of aubergines. Moreover, both milk thistle and aubergines come from the Mediterranean, another reason that they make for natural companions.

Learn more about milk thistle benefits

 

organic milk thistle oil

Dip into sprouted buckwheat

We recommend Erbology Greek Olive raw crackers to go with your baba ganoush. Unlike the traditional pitta bread, these crackers contain sprouted buckwheat. This ingredient helps your body take in valuable minerals and digest them with greater ease.(3) Likewise, the tangy olive, sensual tomato, and peppery coriander notes in these crackers are a very contemporary finishing touch to the spread.

Learn more about buckwheat benefits

Back to basics

Abundant natural goodness is contained in aubergines and tahini. Rich in fiber, aubergines also possess extremely powerful anti-inflammatory nutrients.(4) In turn, tahini offers healthy fats and amino acids, which are the building blocks of energy.(5)

Baba up your baba.

A lot of the fun of dips lies in how you garnish them. Might we suggest topping your baba ganoush with amaranth pops? They would lend a light, nutty crunch, not to mention all nine essential amino acids. Similarly, drizzling any of Erbology’s delectable oils on top of your baba ganoush instead of the traditional olive oil would top up the nourishment of this recipe very nicely.

After that, how about trying delicate twists of lemon peel on top? They might be a lovely detail. After all, lemon is often found in varieties of baba ganoush. Just because we have apple cider vinegar in ours does not mean we have to completely sacrifice the addictive tang of citrus fruits. In the same vein, you could also go further down the fruit road and accompany your baba ganoush with some pomegranate seeds. We don’t know about you, but we find the act of removing the seeds from a pomegranate quite meditative, and the seeds themselves are just exquisite beings.

Hey, you can’t say we didn’t warn you. We are fully devoted to the joys of baba ganoush!

Discover more wholesome dip recipes.

Raw muhammara

muhammara recipe

We are always intrigued by dishes that make appearances in very different cultures. Cucumber salad is a favorite example. It is found in places from Germany, to Latin America, to Japan. Although the recipes vary, there is a surprising amount of consistency. Onions frequently come up alongside something tangy such as citrus juices or vinegars. Even before globalization, maybe our taste buds were not all that different? Continue reading

Sweet green pea canapé

celeriac

Peas are able to offer almost every mineral and vitamin that one might need, as well as a great deal of fiber. The variety of world cuisines that green peas make regular appearances in are testimonies to how versatile they are. From classic Continental European dishes to Indian curries with an intricate elaboration of spices, peas undeniably earn their places. If you, like us, get a kick out of spotting references to food in literature, don’t forget the tale of the princess and the pea. Continue reading

Vegan cream cheese

tkemali cheese dip

A few related questions about cheese have been weighing on us. First, as Bertolt Brecht asked, “what happens to the hole when the cheese is gone?” And then, and more importantly for our daily life, “what happens to the cheese when the dairy is gone?” We now crave salads instead of greasy, fried food, we love raw chocolate with nary a look back…. but cheese, cheese, cheese! Continue reading

References

(1) Kondo et al, “Vinegar intake reduces body weight, body fat mass, and serum triglyceride levels in obese Japanese subjects.” Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, 2009, https://bit.ly/2Dt3qES.

(2) Lim et al, “Vinegar as a functional ingredient to improve postprandial glycemic control-human intervention findings and molecular mechanisms.” Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 2016, https://bit.ly/2V3M50F.

(3) Khnykin, Denis, et al. “Role of Fatty Acid Transporters in Epidermis.” Dermato-Endocrinology, Landes Bioscience, 2011, https://bit.ly/2DaJlUQ.

(4) Stommel, John R. “Phenolic Acid Content and Composition of Eggplant Fruit in a Germplasm Core Subset.” Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 2003, journal.ashspublications.org/content...

(5) Martinchik, A N. “Nutritional Value of Sesame Seeds.” Voprosy Pitaniia., U.S. National Library of Medicine, ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21842753.

Appetizers

Ingredients
Print

  • 3 medium raw aubergines
  • 3 tbsp tahini paste
  • ¼ cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 small onion, peeled and cut in half
  • 2 small garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp Erbology Organic Milk Thistle Oil + 2 tsp for garnishing
  • Pinch of black pepper
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley/ mint
  • ½ tsp chilli flakes

Here's how you make it

  1. Preheat the oven to 175ºC (350º F).
  2. Wash and cut the aubergine in half lengthwise.
  3. Wrap your aubergine halves in aluminum foil and cook in oven for 25 mins or until soft.
  4. Cut the aubergine into large pieces and place in food processor with all the other ingredients.
  5. Blend well until the dip is creamy.
  6. Pour into a bowl, garnish and dig in!

If you tried this recipe...

Share your experience with us. Leave a comment below or post a picture on Instagram, tag @erbology_london #erbology and get a chance to win a healthy treat from us.

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