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Erbology
Vegan sushi recipe

Vegan sushi recipe

  • 3

    Servings

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 25'

  • Total Time

    Total Time 35′

  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

  • Vegan

    Vegan

  • 3

    Servings

  • Prep Time

    Prep Time 25'

    PT25M
  • Total Time

    Total Time 35'

    PT35M
  • Gluten-free

    Gluten-free

  • Vegan

    Vegan

Vegan

Sushi moshi goshi

Sushi was dreamed up in southeast Asia as a way to preserve fish. It was only until later that the fermented rice around the fish was eaten rather than discarded. Still later, the lacto-fermentation process that was used on the rice was replaced with rice vinegar. The word sushi means ‘vinegared rice’. Although sushi travelled from southeastern Asia to China before landing in Japan, it is with this country that it is most often identified. That is to say, how far sushi has come since then!

The key to this easy, refreshing vegan sushi recipe is the marinade. With just three ingredients, you get both umami and sweet elements as well as some serious health benefits – more on this later. Try and marinate more tofu than you need for the sushi, and use it to top a salad or in a sandwich filler along with sliced avocado, grated carrots, and vegan mayonnaise.

You could try experimenting with vegan cream cheese in your sushi too. It sounds unusual, but it’s really not a huge leap from these sushi rolls with cream cheese and fish eggs that you see in many shops. We also love topping sushi with toasted sesame seeds, which provide nutritional benefits as well as crunch. Or you could add Japanese pickles for some serious flavour, not to mention fermented goodness that your gut will love. You could also tell yourself you’re paying homage to the origins of sushi. We haven’t specified brown sushi rice here, but using it would provide you with more nutrients and fibre. And don’t forget your ginger and wasabi! But whatever you add and put in, these rolls are perfect as a quick, satisfying, and healthy work lunch.

Tamari vs. soy sauce

Unsure what the exact difference between tamari and soy sauce is? You aren’t the only one. These closely related condiments are both made from fermented soybeans and possess a savoury flavour. However, soy sauce is identified more with Chinese cuisine, and tamari with Japanese cuisine. In a contemporary kitchen, tamari is often turned to because it’s not as salty as soy. Further, unlike soy sauce, tamari is wheat-free and gluten-free. Moreover, tamari has a lovely thick texture.

Hemp seed oil benefits

This wonder substance has a perfect balance of omega-6 and omega-3 essential fatty acids. These acids cannot be made by the body. Thus, we must obtain them from food. The ratio offered by hemp seed oil is especially beneficial for the human heart and brain. It’s also wonderful for our skin. The fatty acids help to lubricate the external layers of this most important human organ, protecting and moisturising. Want more? Hemp seed oil also nourishes hair. (1,2,3,4)

As compared to other plant oils, hemp seed oil is also remarkable for containing 75-80% polyunsaturated fatty acids. Other oils have far more saturated fats.

Vegan sushi recipe
Vegan sushi recipe
Vegan sushi recipe
Vegan sushi recipe

 

References

1. Harvard Health Publishing. “The Truth about Fats: the Good, the Bad, and the in-between – Harvard Health.” Harvard Health Blog, Feb. 2015, www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/the-truth-about-fats-bad-and-good

2. Simopoulos, A P. “The Importance of the Ratio of Omega-6/Omega-3 Essential Fatty Acids.” Advances in Pediatrics., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Oct. 2002, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909.

3. Miller, Samantha. “Lipid Formulas, for Dry and Sensitive Skin.” The Naked Chemist, 1 Dec. 2017, thenakedchemist.com/lipid-formulas-dry-and-sensitive-skin/.

4. Bouwstra, Joke A, and Maria Ponec. “The Skin Barrier in Healthy and Diseased State.” Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics, Elsevier, 11 July 2006, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii...

Appetisers

Ingredients
Print

Marinated tofu
Sushi rice
  • 1 cup sushi rice
  • 2 tbsp rice vinegar (if you don’t have rice vinegar, substitute with 1 tbsp apple cider vinegar, 1 tsp sweetener of your choice and small pinch of salt)
Sushi rolls
  • 1 quarter red pepper
  • 2 cucumbers
  • 3 small radishes
  • Three fresh salad leaves or fresh baby spinach
  • 3 nori sheets

Typical nutrition / serving

  • Energy (calories) 264 kcal
  • Protein: 7.2g
  • Fat: 2.88g
  • Carbohydrate: 38.81g

Here's how you make it

  1. First, cook the rice by using a 1 ½ : 1 ratio of water to rice. Cook in a rice cooker for 15 minutes or on the stove over medium heat with the lid on.
  2. Secondly, while the rice is cooking, marinate the sliced tofu by mixing it gently with Tamari sauce, maple syrup and Erbology Organic Hemp Seed Oil. Leave aside for about 10-15 minutes.
  3. Julienne all the veggies and put aside.
  4. Once the rice is ready, spread it on a tray to cool it down quickly.
  5. When it’s nearly cool, add the rice vinegar and mix very well. Put aside.
  6. To make a sushi roll, place a nori sheet on a bamboo sushi mat and gently spread cooked sushi rice. Use your fingers to evenly spread the rice. To prevent rice sticking to your hands, first wet your hands with cold water.
  7. Add a small amount (one row) of every veggie and 2-3 slices of marinated tofu.  Roll the bamboo mat over the sushi roll, pressing firmly, to make a more compact roll.
  8. Finally, cut each roll into seven pieces. Serve with Tamari sauce and enjoy!

If you tried this recipe...

Share your experience with us. Leave a comment below or post a picture on Instagram, tag @erbology_london #erbology and get a chance to win a healthy treat from us.

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